Ukrainian sniper takes out Russian soldier with custom rifle, setting a new record for the longest SNIPER KILL
By Ramon Tomey // Nov 21, 2023

An unnamed Ukrainian sniper managed to take out a Russian soldier from almost 2.5 miles away, breaking the previous record.

The Security Service of Ukraine (SBU) confirmed the feat in a Nov. 18 statement, saying that the sniper made the kill at a distance of 3.8 kilometers (2.3 miles). Prior to this, a Canadian special forces sniper took out an enemy at a distance of 3.54 km (2.2 miles) in Iraq back in 2017.

"The SBU sniper set a world record for a successful shot. He hit a Russian soldier from an incredible distance," the statement read. "SBU snipers are changing the rules of world sniping, demonstrating the ability to work effectively at fantastic distances."

According to Metro, the shot was made using a domestically-produced rifle named the "Lord of the Horizon." Ukrainian media outlets also shared footage of the kill, but the footage has not yet been independently verified. The video showed the target, a Russian sniper, falling several seconds after the Ukrainian sniper pulled the trigger – reducing a line of three stationary Russian snipers to two.

According to Firstpost, the Lord of the Horizon rifle was designed and made by the Ukrainian arms maker MAYAK. The custom rifle measures six feet and is chambered in the 12.7x114HL caliber round. The firearm "showcases its prowess by firing bullets that maintain supersonic speeds for nearly 10,000 feet when coupled with the appropriate ammunition." (Related: RUNNING OUT: Ukraine blowing through more ammo than NATO, U.S. can manufacture and provide.)

Around a year ago, a Ukrainian sniper almost broke the record when he hit a Russian soldier from 2.74 km (1.7 miles). While this record did not beat the Canadian sniper's 2017 feat, this became the world's second-longest combat kill.

Sniper feat reminiscent of the Finnish "White Death"

Reading about the Ukrainian snipers' kills brings back memories of World War II, where a Finnish sniper made history for taking out multiple Russian enemies.

Simo Hayha (1905-2002) gained the moniker "The White Death" due to his multiple kills of Russian soldiers. As a child, he was known for his marksmanship sharpened by his hunting skills. While he won numerous local marksmanship competitions, Hayha did not receive formal sniper training until 1938.

When WWII arrived at Finland's doorstep, Hayha was among those called to the front lines. He did his duty without saying a word, taking out 505 Red Army soldiers while doing so. For this, the Russians branded him "The White Death."

The legendary sniper devised several techniques to avoid detection. First, he eschewed the rifle scope in favor of an iron sight as the scope's glare would give him away. He would set up position in his snow pit before dawn and remain there until sunset.

"Hayha dressed in plenty of layers and kept bread and sugar in his pockets, which he ate to give himself enough energy to stay warm. He was even known to keep snow in his mouth, so as to not have his breath give away his location," an article by War History Online stated.

However, a Red Army soldier managed to shoot at Hayha – mangling his lower jaw and deforming his left cheek. He survived the ordeal, staying 14 months in the hospital and undergoing 26 surgeries. After the war, he was given a farm in southeast Finland.

Visit UkraineWitness.com for more stories about Ukraine's ongoing conflict with Russia.

Watch this footage of the Ukrainian sniper dubbed the "Ghost of Bakhmut" taking out Russian troops.

This video is from the High Hopes channel on Brighteon.com.

More related stories:

U.S. proxy war: Kyiv's counteroffensive kills or wounds 800 Ukrainians per day, Russia reports.

Ukrainian armed forces failed to achieve goals in three months of counteroffensive effort, Russian defense minister reports.

Massive numbers of Ukrainian forces now surrounded by Russian troops in Donbas region as U.S. continues pouring in weapons.

Sources include:

Metro.co.uk

Firstpost.com

NationalWW2Museum.org

WarHistoryOnline.com

Brighteon.com



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