America’s youth now such weak snowflakes that they can’t even throw grenades in U.S. Army basic training

There’s no doubt about it: We all know some amazing young adults, but millennials as a group have not earned much respect for themselves. Known disparagingly as “snowflakes,” “generation cry baby,” and the “worst generation ever to have lived,” most of us have come to realize that we should keep our expectations low when dealing with those born between 1983 and 2000. While there’s no doubt that they are the most technically savvy generation in history, it seems that there is a massive disconnect when it comes to their basic life skills and the ability to take care of themselves.

As Breitbart’s Ben Shapiro once reported, despite being hailed as the future and “the ones we’ve been waiting for” by people like former President Barrack Obama, the reality is that millennials have proven to be the “least useful generation in America.”

Shapiro wryly noted:

Well, there may be a few things [they] can’t solve. Like simple reading comprehension problems, for example. And how to stop living in mom’s basement.

The latest example of their less than stellar abilities is the fact that the U.S. Army has had to drop its requirement that all graduates be able to throw a grenade between 60 and 100 feet. This, it would seem, is something that young people can simply no longer do, having not learned to throw a ball growing up.

“We are finding that there are a large number of trainees that come in that quite frankly just physically don’t have the capacity to throw a hand grenade 20 to 25 to 30 meters,” noted Maj. Gen. Malcolm Frost. “In 10 weeks, we are on a 48-hour period; you are just not going to be able to teach someone how to throw if they haven’t thrown growing up.”

Of course, it would be unfair to blame this lack of basic skills on the individuals themselves; the parents who raised an entire generation of kids who simply don’t have the basic skills to take care of themselves, are squarely to blame. Allowing these kids to do nothing but play PlayStation and surf the net has left them physically undeveloped and emotionally immature. (Related: Millennials are totally unprepared for the realities of life, study finds.)

In fact, it is not just their lack of co-ordination or inability to throw a grenade that the Army is complaining about. After surveying close to 30,000 commissioned officers, warrant officers and non-commissioned officers, it became abundantly obvious that there is an alarming lack of discipline and a pervasive spirit of entitlement among young recruits.

“What leaders have observed in general is they believe that there is too much of a sense of entitlement, questioning of lawful orders, not listening to instruction, too much of a buddy mentality with NCOs and officers and a lot of tardiness being late to formation and duties,” Frost said. “These are trends that they see as increasing that they think are part of the discipline aspect that is missing and that they would like to see in the trainees that become soldiers that come to them as their first unit of assignment.”

The Army’s solution to the problem has been to completely redesign its Basic Combat Training program, where it will focus on building more discipline and pride, as well as improving basic fitness, communications, marksmanship and first aid skills. (Related: Lacking any real job skills, broke millennials are now donating blood plasma as a routine source of income.)

“First-unit-of-assignment leaders want Initial Entry Training to deliver disciplined, physically-fit new soldiers who are willing to learn, they are mentally tough, professional and are proud to serve in the United States Army,” said Frost.

Of course, relatively few millennials will be willing to leave their parents’ basements to enlist in the first place, so it can only be imagined that this improved training program will benefit relatively few young people. (Related: Discover more Millennial exploits at

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