Migrants taking advantage of Europe’s socialist-style healthcare threaten to collapse economy


Leaders and citizens of Muslim nations have lamented the impurities and inequities of the West on numerous occasions, but increasingly, as the Middle East falls apart, they seem incredibly willing to partake of its generosity, advanced societies and technology. Hypocrisy, it seems, trumps ideology when desperation sets in.

However, the West – especially economically teetering Europe – is having difficulty coping with an onslaught of newly impassioned Muslim migrants who are taking full advantage of European hospitality and benefits. What’s surprising is that Euro governments are allowing themselves to be so blatantly taken advantage of, to the point of harming their own citizens.

Cancer treatment

In Britain, for example, the migrant surge is putting the finishing touches on collapsing the country’s vaunted National Health Service, which was already under strain.

As reported by Britain’s Daily Mail, a leading cancer treatment expert said recently that the NHS has been left “on its knees” by the controlled migration from the rest of the European Union.

Prof. Angus Dalgleish, head of the Cancer Vaccine Institute, said that the service is being drained of cancer resources by so-called health tourists that have been denied care or have been unable to obtain it in their home countries.

Cancer treatment can cost £200,000 (about $290,100) and, under Brussels rules, Britain has to offer it to all EU nationals.

British government is making it worse

Dalgleish said that’s partly why the NHS currently has a £3 billion ($4.35 billion) deficit. But he also says that the British government is worsening the problem and hindering progress into key disease areas by “blindly adhering to EU directives.”

“Our membership of the EU is putting an intolerable strain on our NHS,” Dalgleish, a world-renowned melanoma expert, told a medical conference.

“The NHS is on its knees and could collapse completely,” he said. “NHS Trusts were not prepared for the millions of EU migrants who have poured into Britain because the Government estimate was nowhere near the reality.

“GP services are collapsing under the huge number of people they are having to treat and this has led to less than 20 per cent of students wanting to become GPs,” he continued.

“Britain is attracting thousands of health tourists from across the EU who cannot get certain drugs or treatments in their home country so come to Britain and demand them as EU citizens,” he said. “Cancer treatment can cost £200,000 a year per patient and while we remain in the EU, Britain has to offer treatment for any EU citizen who comes here so as to not discriminate.

‘The Health Service is being bled dry – this is why our NHS faces a £3 billion deficit,” the cancer expert noted.

Dalgleish, a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, also said that EU rules and regulations prevent certain cancer trials, which holds back potential medical advances, and perhaps even cures.

“The introduction of the EU clinical trials directive meant academic led studies carried out in Britain became illegal if not performed to new EU standards. By blindly adhering to EU directives, the British Government has hindered crucial medical research in key disease areas,” he said.

“The unfathomable amount of EU regulation and bureaucracy has led to a third less clinical studies taking place in Britain,” he said, adding that at one point Britain led the world in such studies, “but because of the EU, we now lag behind the United States.”

Dalgleish also launched broadsides against the EU working time directive, which British Prime Minister David Cameron decided not to challenge during referendum negotiations with Brussels.

“This has destroyed the ability of the NHS to deliver service and training. Training has been hit so hard that standards have slipped to worrying levels,” he told attendees at The Good Life After Brexit gathering, a conference whose theme is getting Britain out of the EU. “Surgeons are not gaining the same experience a registrar previously had when appointed to consultant positions.

“Other EU countries were creative in incorporating the working time directive to ensure specialists could get the 60 hours a week experience needed but the British Government adopted the directive without thinking through the ramifications,” he said. “As a result, training has been hit so hard that standards have dropped and patient care has suffered.”

Sources:

Daily Mail

The New York Times



Comments
comments powered by Disqus

RECENT NEWS & ARTICLES